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Dark times ahead

Dark times ahead

While other escape to the South, we head North - again!

Once again an expedition beyond daylight is in preparation. Meanwhile, new findings from earlier expeditions have seen the light of day.

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Congratulations Dr. Hobbs!

Congratulations Dr. Hobbs!

An award winning Dr. of the CircA project in Mare Incognitum

Dr. Laura Hobbs receives award for Postgraduate of the Year 2016 by UHI

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New monster from the deep

New monster from the deep

Archeologists fear it, biologists love it

First record of a shipworm in Arctic waters

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Cruising in the dark

Cruising in the dark

A new year has started - time to continue our dark activities

Cutting-edge autonomous vehicles and traditional sampling in the polar night

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Werewolves! Here is the published proof!

Werewolves! Here is the published proof!

Beyond any doubt: Werewolves migrate

Finally the proof for werewolf activities has been published in Current Biology!

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ArcticABC project summary

Welcome to ArcticABC! 

The Arctic ABC programme will design innovative autonomous drifting observatories to be deployed in Arctic ice covered waters. The infrastructure is based on cutting edge sensor technology, and the autonomous drift stations will provide unprecedented opportunities to conduct genuine scientific exploration supported by modern data acquisition methods in arguably the least known realm of the planet – the Arctic Ocean during the polar night and winter. The Arctic ABC programme is based on two NFR funded projects; the Arctic ABC research project (project number 244319) and the Arctic ABC Development national infrastructure project (project number 245923).

Collecting information over long time in remote places like the Arctic Ocean is a logistically complex and resource demanding activity. Satellites and electronic systems that work autonomously, i.e. without the need for constant human supervision, simplify research in this area that is logistically complex to access. They reduce the need for people to be present at the site and they are capable of gathering more information in a given time than what can be achieved during a brief ship-based field expedition. In this project, off-the-shelf electronic equipment is used to implement stand-alone sensors to address specific questions.

The environmental details that our autonomous instrumentation reveal will be complemented by solid in situ validation samples and experiments. The biology campaigns of the project focus around three primary research themes: 1. How do pelagic (water column) species perceive light, in particular during the long dark season? 2. How, when and where do pelagic species conduct vertical migrations in a highly seasonal Arctic, especially during the dark season? 3. Who is present and active under sea ice, in the winter, and what do they feed on?

Knowledge extracted from these campaigns is important to develop and improve model representation of Arctic processes. In Arctic ABC we will use models to test sympagic and pelagic life-history concepts. We will also use models to explore and project responses of Arctic ecosystems to climate change and ice cover reduction, in particular. Results from the modelling will be analysed in a geopolitical perspective where the interests of states as well as potential gaps in legal regimes for resource utilization will be addressed.

Arctic Ocean ecosystems: applied technology, biological interactions and Consequences in an era of abrupt climate change (Arctic ABC) is a modern, multi and interdisciplinary research activity. 

You can find regular updates for the project in the News Blog section. Or follow us on Twitter.

 

This video gives a brief introduction to the project:

 

Mare upcoming events

Jul
27

27.07.2017 - 30.07.2017

Oct
9

09.10.2017 - 13.10.2017

Nov
8

08.11.2017 - 10.11.2017

The Mare Incognitum projects are members of the ARCTOS research network

The Mare Incognitum web pages are maintained by Marine Night technician Daniel Vogedes, UiT.

The content is provided by the projects, for comments please check the project pages and contact the project leader.